Hannover Messe 2019 Energy supply off into the desert

| Editor: Theresa Knell

A drone can fly over solar thermal power stations, collecting and analysing important information for installation optimisation.

The drones can take pictures, evaluate soiling, and detect leaks and mechanical damage.
The drones can take pictures, evaluate soiling, and detect leaks and mechanical damage.
(Source: DLR – Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt)

In Hall 27, Booth H70, the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) includes in its display the remotely controlled Q-Fly drone, said to contribute substantially to efficient monitoring of solar thermal power stations. Such installations are often spread over very large areas, usually in remote regions and in many cases in deserts, so monitoring and maintenance is often time-consuming and difficult.

In such situations, the drone can fly over solar fields following individually selected routes and take pictures, evaluate soiling, and detect leaks and mechanical damage. The heart of this mobile monitoring system is said to be the automatic analysis software. It transfers important information to operators and service providers to enable optimisation of the efficiency and service lifetime of the installation.

The central emphasis of the DLR presentation is on how energy supply may look in the future. Digitisation will be an essential factor in success, we hear. This aspect is illustrated clearly using a model of a municipal energy supply. This takes account of concepts for changing coal power stations to thermal energy storage installations and results of research on batteries and micro gas turbines.

Visit DLR – Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt at Hannover Messe in Hall 27, Booth H70.

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